On the other hand,because people were curious about “Sarah Baartman’s” unique body, she was put…

On the other hand,because people were curious about “Sarah Baartman’s” unique body, she was put…

On the other hand,because people were curious about “Sarah Baartman’s” unique body, she was put on display at science fairs, like a cage animal. “Sarah Baartman,” Sarah, had unique body features, particularly her large buttock. Sarah was a slave (Croot, 2016). Sarah had large buttocks, which made her unique, attractive, and ultimately an icon (Henderson, 2014). Her large buttocks were the main attracting factor in her personality, and that made her different compared to other African-American women at that time (Henderson, 2014).

Sara’s looks were notably different compared to the other females in that period; that is why she is called ‘The Hottentot Venus’ (Croot, 2016). African-American women have been enduring racial stereotyping for many decades, especially in terms of the compounded matrix regarding sexuality, gender, and race (Henderson, 2014). For example, the oppressing images of black womanhood are these typical icons such as Jezebel, Welfare Queen, Sapphire, and essentially the ‘Hottentot Venus Moniker Icon’ (Henderson, 2014). Nonetheless, to prove the validity of Clark’s Doll Test, the study was conducted by Walcott-McQuigg (1995). Walcott-McQuigg (1995) has shown that about 50 percent of African-American women participants reported that stress did negatively affect their weight-control behavior. If nothing else, at its core, the doll test essentially shows how the phenomenon has the potential to trigger wrong self-identity among individuals belonging to certain communities (Maddox, 2008).These women must also deal with other stressors such as heavy workloads, sexism, and racism (Walcott-McQuigg, 1995). Consequently, the stereotypical views against African-American women often make it difficult for the concerned population to adjust themselves to the traditional White-American lifestyle, and this adds to the ever-increasing degree of stress on African-American women.

In any case, at its core, the Doll Test has shown that stereotypes may often lead to stigmatization, and that the phenomenon has the potential to trigger wrong self-identity and self-efficacy among individuals belonging to a particular community. Self-efficacy is defined as one’s sense of self-worth, meaning that a person has a sense of competency and is efficient (Bandura, 1994; Schiele, Youngstrom, Stephan, & Lever, 2014). This is unlike one’s self-esteem level. To simplify, self-efficacy is the confidence by which a person feels competent and efficient. Moreover, when an individual exerts extra willpower to competence leads to success, following, a sense of self-efficacy as arbitrate, by the insight that is, results are considered internally instead of externally controlled (Schiele, Youngstrom, Stephan, & Lever, 2014).

Competence leads to success through the site of perseverance, as mediated employing the locus of control to the closing stages of self-efficacy (Schiele, Youngstrom, Stephan, & Lever, 2014). Therefore, the aspect of self-efficacy is the idea that one is capable of managing the crack in the break to accomplishment, by an adding perseverance to existing proficiency. The Doll Test’s importance is witnessed in the present context by citing the fact that even today, specific racial groups in the United States are still being stereotyped by their mere hair-texture. These women commonly display a great desire for longer hair as well, but think it is impossible because of their excess hair breakage issues (Lewallen, et al., 2015).

On the other hand,because people were curious about “Sarah Baartman’s” unique body, she was put…

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